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The ARCH annual report for 2015-16 is now available to view.

 

Download it here.

Homelessness continues to rise 07/07/2016

DCLG has published the latest figures on homelessness in England for the Quarter period, January to March 2016. The number of households accepted as homeless and the number of households living in temporary accommodation have increased compared to the same quarter last year.

 

The total number of households accepted as homeless were 14,780 - up by 2% over the previous quarter figure and 9% on the figure of 13,520 for the same quarter last year.

 

The total number of households living in temporary accommodation awaiting the offer of settled accommodation was 71,540 - up by 11% on the same quarter in 2015. It's a massive increase of nearly 50% on the number of households living in temporary accommodation (48,010) at 31 December 2010.

 

Local authorities took action to prevent a further 198,100 households becoming homeless during 2015/16. 

 

John Bibby, ARCH Chief Executive, commented: "The number of households living in temporary accommodation continues to rise. With stock retained councils facing the prospect of having to sell vacant council housing to fund payments to the government under the Housing and Planning Act to reimburse housing associations for Right to Buy discounts, the concern is that the number of households living in temporary accommodation (and the cost to the council general fund and council tax payer) will continue to rise.

 

The rise of nearly 50% since 2010 in the numbers of households living in temporary accommodation is extremely concerning. While the government continues to focus its priorities on expanding home ownership, the outlook for those unfortunate households facing the loss of their home through no fault of their own remains grim with the prospect of ever greater numbers living in often unsuitable temporary accommodation."

 

Our submission to the CLG Select Committee inquiry into homelessness argues that any homes councils may be forced to sell should be replaced on a one for one basis and homes for rent should take priority in any replacement programme so that there is no long term overall loss of social rented housing available to homeless households living in temporary accommodation and others on council housing waiting lists.

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